Crandall mine update – 6th day

Edit: 1:55 pm (MST) Watching news conference now…..well – not much that’s new. Richard Stickler, Asst Labor secretary (MSHA) talked about what’s being done to improve and ensure the safety of those conducting the rescue while slogging forward as speedily as possible, which is still just too slow for those waiting of course. A third hole is being drilled into a ‘bleeder area’ of the mine diagonally.

And, I still find that Bob Murray totally insufferable.

A news conference is scheduled at 1:30 (3:30 pm – EST). Still – no sign or signs of the six missing men.

This headline from Reuters says it best: Hope fades for trapped Utah miners.

The damage to the Crandall Canyon mine and the trapping of six workers appears to have been caused by the floor rising and the walls falling in and not a ceiling collapse, a federal regulator and other sources say.

“It was a heave,” said a source who is a family member of one of the trapped miners and has been briefed on the condition of the mine by those who have assisted in the rescue effort…….”Heave” is a coal miner’s term for what happens when the floor rises.
Another source, who has been a coal miner for decades and has assisted in the rescue effort said: “I’ve never seen anything like this.” …. The veteran miner said the floor rose about 2 feet.”

Anyone interested in this disaster specifically should bookmark the Salt Lake City Tribune. They’ve been doing some good work.

A memo has been obtained by the SLC Tribune illustrates how owners of the mine were skirting around the issue of the”poor roof conditions” in working the mine before there was “heavy damage” in tunnels following a bump. Whatever the terminology, working conditions were not safe.

[An MSHA official began an inspection of the roof in the Crandall Canyon mine in late May, which was still under way, according to MSHA records. No violations had been reported. Stickler would not discuss the inspection.]

Advertisements

21 Responses

  1. I’m glad I’m not the only one finding Murray insufferable. From the get go it bothered me that he thought he knew more than the USGS on seismic activity, and the damn media didn’t say a damn thing. Of course, I also felt that was his way to cover his ass from wrong-doing.

  2. I was dumbfounded as I watched the very first news conference from the Crandall mine in which Murray droned on and on and on about him and his company. It was around 12 minutes before Murray mentioned the miners. On two different occasions during two different news conferences, Murray has referred to the miners as “bodies” – meaning when I’ve heard him say it. The first time, no one challenged it. The second time a reporter caught it and challenged him and Murray offered that he had misspoke. Misspoke, my ass.

  3. Misspoke? Yeah, and I’ve got some swampland up for sale!

    The guy is barreling towards a huge lawsuit, and the longer this goes on, the better the chance to get some meaningful safety measures for miners. I hate that it’s on the potential deaths of these miners, but this rescue debacle is a huge motivation.

    As Murray denied that the miners were taking place in retreat mining, I can’t help wondering if the practice of retreat mining had something to do with the initial collapse, in that the walls were left too unstable. I still have a sinking feeling that retreat mining had some part in all this.

  4. archcrone and leftistmoon

    Retreat mining was definitely being practiced – and then some.

    From an ‘inside’ source.

  5. ferret

    Early this monring I ran across this story in the SLC Tribune and highlighted a couple of the paragraphs I found disconcerting. I’m a supporter of unions; I do not trust management as I feel their interests are not my interests. Their interests are the company’s interests, the owner’s interests. As soon as Bob Murray so vehemently denied “retreat mining” was being done, I thought – ‘yep, that’s exactly what they were doing.’ Stickler’s eyes about blicked out of his head.

    http://www.sltrib.com/ci_6616544#top

  6. I am from WY I’m not crazy about Bob Murray either….can’t pin point why I dislike him but I just don’t trust the things he says on TV…he seems to be covering his rear end..
    What causes a floor in a mine to heave????
    My heart goes out to the families!

  7. I have tried to follow this whole diaster from the very beginning, and I continue to be appalled by the media’s lack of interest in the problems facing Mr. Murray. Their ONLY interest is to demean everyone from the getgo, report false facts from disgruntled employees/union offivials who are sought out to make statements to fill space, and generally cloak the entire situation in their own little circle of inuendo. Katrina is an excellent example of media overload. No matter what is said, the reporters KNOW better, and always have the last word. Rebuttal is out of the question and, if a chance is offered, interruptions and accusations by the media always leave everyone confused as to the real story.. Listening is a lost art among reporters. If they are not talking, then there isn’t much worth listening to. People ask why are we, Americans, so caustic towards others. Take a long bow, media outlets. You are 100% the cause of the prevailing cynicism.

  8. I have tried to follow this whole diaster from the very beginning, and I continue to be appalled by the media’s lack of interest in the problems facing Mr. Murray.

    What problems facing Mr. Murray are you referring specifically?

    Until the 19th (Aug), I watched each and every news conference. ‘The media’ gave Murray a platform for days on end.

    It’s interesting because I think the mainstream media (MSM), as we’re fond of referring to it, is either asleep at the switch or are paid media whores – or both. 😉

  9. No. I think from the start the media was always seeking negatives. David Brinkly’s book “Everyone is Entitled to My Opinion” certainly defines the media reporters. Positive commentary is definitely lacking, only negatives.

  10. OK…I don’t agree. This isn’t specifically about the media overall anyway.

    You mentioned the “problems facing Mr. Murray” and that’s to what I’m enquiring. The media was NOT one of the problems. Mr. Murray did a good job of ‘controlling the message’ via that mainstream media, especially televised (national) media.

  11. That’s your view. I think differently. The problems facing Murray were tremendous: the loss of the miners; how to best locate them; how to relate to the families; how to ward off the media’s constant pressure of trying to place blame. He said he ran his plans by several engineering firms and other experts including the Govt. officials to be sure the plan was the best available to him under the circumstances–a mountain covering six of his people. Now, media is saying perhaps he and Stickler should have called experts from around the world at the outset. Any delay in immediate action would have created an outroar from both families and media. You are dammed if you do and dammed if you don’t. The media needs cleansing.

    As you can tell, I blame the media for most of today’s problems. Look at the way they have undermined the President with all of their Monday moring diatribes. The surge just got approved, and the media minds belabored it to the delight of our enemies. They do more damage that good, that’s for certain.

  12. As you can tell, I blame the media for most of today’s problems. Look at the way they have undermined the President with all of their Monday moring diatribes. The surge just got approved, and the media minds belabored it to the delight of our enemies.

    I’m sure you can tell from the tenor of my place here, I’m not a fan of this president and especially this administration. You’re very welcome to comment, please – just be civil is all I ask.

    We both have issues with the media; we look at it differently.

    As for Murray, I think he used the media to his advantage. According to Murray himself, it took them a day and a half “to mobilize.” He doesn’t explain what that means – was there no plan in place; they didn’t know what to do? They did but they were unorganized?

  13. We all remember things differently. So, you do your thing and I will do mine.

    Now, I have been trying to get some info re the 5th hole. Unlike you, perhaps, I perfer to think the miners are still alive, even with all the odds apparently against it. Do you have any status of the situation?? The new hole was going to take 58 hours (without any equipment problems) and I think the start was at least that long ago. Dean and the mid-america flooding replaced the miner’s story.

    I hope I have been civil. I usually am.

  14. Here Bud, click here or if you go to the top of this page and click on the header, ‘left side of the moon’ (3:35 PM…..Geez, I just thought of this – or duh, where it says “home” – after the fact….) it will take you to the front page, and you’ll see the latest I’ve run across, as well as all that I’ve written almost every day concerning Crandall Canyon.

    I wasn’t saying you weren’t being civil. You’ve been absolutely fine. Many in my family differ with what & how I think regarding politics especially. We talk back and forth about everything. Some things we agree on, some we don’t.

    I was watching CNN one day (Sunday, I think) and they were showing a state police helicopter (pilot, co-pilot, & another dude) picking up people out of water after being swept away on a highway in Oklahoma.

    I’m following the mining story because it’s more regional and because of the worker safety/workplace safety issues.

    Thanks for stopping by & giving a different perspective.

  15. I am glad I did stop by–it has been interesting to me too.
    Good luck with your site. I am a Bush advocate, so right there we would never find common ground.

    My take on Mr. Murray’s speech yesterday is that the rescue effort is essentially over, and recovery is not really in the cards.

    I consider myself to be reasonably brave, but never would I go into a mine. I heard the comments about the money being really good which is what keeps miners mining. Not enough of the long green to entice me. (My wife got me into the Carlsbad Caveran (sp?) a while back. It was something to behold, but that’s it for me). I like to look up and see blue.

  16. Such a simple reason why all this happened. A mountain that has settled for many thousands of years at least, it’s layers solidified to a point. Suddenly, miners remove the base of the mountain and it collapses into an 1800 ft high pile of loose rubble. Every consecutive disturbance will continue to granularize the overburden. How could anybody involved in mining condone “retreat” mining, where you bring down the entire overburden in one area and then continue mining in an adjacent area?

  17. A mountain that has settled for many thousands of years at least, it’s layers solidified to a point. Suddenly, miners remove the base of the mountain and it collapses into an 1800 ft high pile of loose rubble. Every consecutive disturbance will continue to granularize the overburden.

    Precisely!

    And there’s mountaintop mining, where ya just blow the mountain up. Or at the very least, the ‘top.’ I think that’s much safer, don’t you? /snark/

  18. There’s safer and then there’s cheaper. It’s always a balance between greed and risk. The miner’s weighing their greed (and need) for the relatively high pay against the risk. The mine owners seem to minimize the risk until a disaster happens.
    Even with a number of them killed, few of the miners would hesitate to go back in to extract more coal, they desperately need the jobs.

  19. The miner’s weighing their greed (and need) for the relatively high pay against the risk. The mine owners seem to minimize the risk until a disaster happens

    I was being a smart-ass, snarky, in other words. (No connection to Lewis Carroll, I might add).

    I’d be interested in knowing the pay grade and the application of certain benefits of the miners at Crandall Canyon. Three of the trapped miners were Mexican nationals; they were NOT American citizens. There’s been relatively little mention about whether they might be considered ‘illegal aliens’ or the exact nature of their status.

  20. I have been following the mining incident since it has happened. I know at the beginning of the week there was talk that it would be left as a ” tomb” and they would recover the people’s bodies that are stuck in there. I have not heard a word since. Has there been any new news on this? Also, I have found a pettion online one of the minors relatives started to continue the resuce effort to recover the bodies. If anyone is interested
    http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/drill-crandall-canyon-mine/signatures-page1.html

    My heart goes out to all the families, and I am praying daily for them and their loved ones.
    Dolores- Signal Mt. TN

  21. My heart goes out to all the families, and I am praying daily for them and their loved ones. Dolores- Signal Mt. TN

    Mine too, Delores – mine too.

    If you go to the top of this page, towards the upper left hand corner, there’s a page that says ‘Home‘ OR just hit my name. This will take you to the front page and you can scroll down for more stories.

    The 6th hole broke thru and showed only rubble. There will be a news conference this afternoon, Sunday – the 26th. Mine owners and that damned MSHA as well, I would imagine.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: