Someone Mention the Coalition of the Willing?

multinationalforce-iraqdui.jpgYesterday afternoon I heard a story on NPR about the dwindling support of coalition forces. Now imagine my surprise when I later heard President Bush make reference to some 36 nations making up the multinational forces in Iraq. How to put this – BULLSHIT. I counted 25.

As reported, there were dozens of small countries who helped lend that “multinational veneer” of U.S. coverage as 90% of troop strength is from U.S. troops. Of the four major allies: UK (Britain), Poland, Denmark, and Australia – three still have a significant present. Via NPR, most coalition forces are in noncombat zones and are serving as engineers, mine clearers, health care workers.

Troop Strength – Coalition Forces [25 countries]

  • UK – down to about 5500
  • Poland – 1/3 of the original contingent
  • Australia – 1/2 of original, NPR gave troop strength at 2000.
  • Denmark – Denmark may be out by now. *
  • Czech Republic & El Salvador – scheduled to leave this year.
  • Georgia – increasing forces
  • S. Korea
  • Bulgaria
  • Latvia
  • UN troops & NATO-sponsored troops.

Those in blue are the U.S.’s major allies in Iraq. Denmark’s mandate* ended in June of this year (2007) and was extended until August, but that was changed and the Danes begin leaving early. As reported, “Danish military spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel Jes Rasmussen denied that the early withdrawal was due to security reasons.

“We have found a way of packing our bags more quickly than expected and the soldiers have worked hard for that,” he told TV2.

Yep, I can throw my shit into a sack at the speed of light too when the need calls for it.

The Brookings Institute had this list. Regardless of how it’s spun, it’s an American (U.S.) operation.

COALITION FORCES

 

  • US -132,000
  • UK – 7,100
  • South Korea – 3,200
  • Poland – 900
  • Georgia – 800-850
  • Australia – 900
  • Romania – 600-865
  • Denmark – 460
  • El Salvador – 380
  • Bulgaria – 150
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