Torture, The Teabagger King, & Hugo Chavez

Happened to catch one of MSNBC’s military analysts, Colonel Jack Jacobs, yesterday morning.  I’m not a fan at all, really; however it doesn’t mean he’s always wrong or off the mark.  He’s on the mark here:  If you cannot get it out of someone the first or second time, try something else.  And besides, he’s had better luck with food, cigarettes, and medical care in getting information.  He had this to say back in 2005:

“At the end of the day, it’s very easy to distinguish between the right thing and the wrong thing to do. If you do the wrong thing, you’re not going to get any positive payoff from it and it’s going to be of at some great cost,” Jacobs said. “We get much more information if we treat people properly.

He also had this to say about the destruction of the CIA tapes that showed the torture of certain detainees via waterboarding and other techniques.  Ya know, where the president stopped off Langley to assure no repercussions would be forthcoming for “those jus’ followin’ orders.”

books

Crooks & Liars has dubbed Newt Gingrich ‘The Teabagger King’. Why it is that no one in real leadership positions within the GOP can bring themselves to get before a camera and bring up the president’s shortcomings?  Ya know – shaking hands with haters of America, talking to those who are “enemies of America,” and then there’s the minor bit of genuflecting before the Saudi king.

The importance of the Chavez hand shake is the report you did just now, on the jump in book sales from #54,000 to number 2. Everywhere in Latin America, enemies of America are going to use the picture of Chavez smiling and being with the President as proof that Chavez is now legitimate, that he’s acceptable, He’s a dictatorial figure, he’s an anti American figure, but what I find distressing is this administration is opposed to looking for oil off shore, but the President bows to the Saudi King…

It does matter to the world…

Only in Newt’s warped orbit.  The interest lies in the book handed over to Obama. Written by Eduardo Gaelano, ‘Open Veins of Latin America.’  I don’t which idiocy is worse. The idiocy of some loony ultra-right blogger who says it treasonous to keep the book or the idiocy of some of the responses of the book’s Amazon site, where someone called ‘Real Women Read’ makes the declaration to only buy books about America written by Americans.   It’s pretty obvious most of those responding know little if anything about the U.S.’s involvement in Latin America.

And this, this is part of the reason why -taken from Encarta:

After 1870 liberal dictatorships arose which, in the name of order and progress, promoted the development of coffee as the region’s main export; at the expense of a more diversified agriculture, banana cultivation, mostly controlled by foreign interests, also became important. After 1900, the U.S.-based United Fruit Company was a major force in Central America’s economy. Developing railroads, shipping, and other subsidiary interests, the company was known as the “Octopus” among resentful Central Americans. U.S. investment and government became the dominant force on the isthmus, beginning with the establishment of Panamanian independence in 1903. The United States helped form the Central American Court of Justice, but U.S. military occupation of Nicaragua from 1912 to 1933 undermined its effectiveness.

The United Fruit Company was an integral part of studying the history and politics of Latin America and the influence of the United States in that political history when studying History (Latin American focus).

I suggest more of you do it.

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  1. […] Original post by Left Side of the Moon […]

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