Women’s Rights are Human Rights

Moveon.org has video of a speech Hillary Clinton gave to the UN Women’s Conference in Beijing, 1995. It was brought out due to phrasing last week of “gay rights are human rights” said somewhere and the similarity to Hillary’s claim that ‘women’s rights are human rights” in 1995.

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Coincidentally after viewing the video, I caught this segment on NPR’s ‘Talk of the Nation’ entitled the ‘Insidious Tradition of Taking Child Brides.’  A guest on the show was Stephanie Sinclair, a photographer, who did a photo story for National Geographic on child brides.  Ms. Sinclair has a remarkable website with various photo shoots from around the world, one of the most searing on self-immolation.

Nujood Ali is mentioned specifically by Ms. Sinclair in the interview with NPR.  Nujood was forced into a marriage at the age of 9.  Seeking a divorced at the age of 10 – she was the “first child bride in her country to demand and get a divorce.”  She has an amazing story, and she also met up with Hillary Clinton in 2008 when Ms. Clinton was honored with Glamour Magazine’s ‘Woman of the Year’ award.

Here’s another clip of Hillary Clinton in her inimitable way laying it down during questioning from Rep. Christopher Smith, (R-NJ) on reproductive rights.  As an aside, notice Rep. Smith’s reference of:  “I yield to the distinguished gentleman.”  You’ll never convince me you care about women when using language that doesn’t recognize them for who they are.

 

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Two if by land….one if by land, what’s by the sea?

What is it about some who want to revel in their ignorance and stupidity like pigs in mud?

Paul Revere is remembered for his historic Midnight Ride warning colonists of the impending British Army attack. He also had an illustrious career as an engraver, silversmith, watchmaker and soldier.

Video here of American history involving Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride.

Real American history of Paul Revere.

Listen, my children, and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,
One, if by land, and two, if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm….

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,—
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.

 

 

 

Solar Power coupled with Crone Power

Via Sierra Magazine: Five Maasai Grandmothers Light the Way to Solar-Powered Huts: The illiterate women learned how to install panels.

International Women’s Day

Google’s input:

Esperanza Spalding …… ’nuff said

Some Egyptian Women in this Revolution.

It’s 8:45 am, Tuesday in Cairo.

There’s been quite a bit of back-and-forth about the involvement of women in the Egyptian protests.  Some say not; some say so.  In the first couple of days I saw predominantly men, young/younger men. Then I started looking for veils, head coverings and began finding and seeing more and more women.  Some of those faces have been captured in a slide show from the Global Post.

Then there’s this young woman leading some men in cadenced ‘cheers.’

Democracy Now! had this interview with “Egypt’s most renowned human rights activists, Nawal El Saadawi.  A well-known feminist, psychologist, writer, former political prisoner in Egypt, she lived in exile for years due to numerous death threats.”  It’s an amazing 6 minute interview.

And you remember, Mubarak is the continuation of Sadat. And both Sadat and Mubarak, you know, their regime worked against the people, men and women. And they created this gap between the poor and rich. They brought the so-called business class to govern us. Egypt became an American colony. And we are dominated by the U.S. and Israel. And 80 million people, men and women, have no say in the country.

And you see today that people in the streets for six days, and they told Mubarak to go. He should have gone, if he respects the will of the people. That’s democracy. Because what’s democracy? It’s to respect the will of the people. The people govern themselves. So, really, we are happy.

Sounds a tad familiar.  “They brought the so-called business class to govern us.

A compilation of some of ‘best protest signs’ of the Egyptian protests with one of my favorites below.  Please note the woman over the sign holder’s left shoulder.

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One of the most thought provoking was a quote attributed to JFK: “Those who make peaceful protest impossible will make violent protest inevitable.”

The Whirling Dervish that is Sarah Palin

It was the banner that caught my eye – ‘Worst Governor Ever.’  How many folks could that possibly refer?  Butch?  Jan Brewer? Rick Perry? Haley Barbour? Ah, geez…the list is sooo long.

But here – here, it is – and then we’ll discuss and bitch.  The woman holding up the sign is Kathleen Gustafson of Homer, Alaska.

What immediately struck me was the overall tone of Palin.  She’s not about substance so there’s this sing-songy cadence, cheer-leading stance she takes on. There was absolutely no interest in listening; it’s about hearing herself speak, inanely. Continue reading